Pulitzer For Coverage of Syrian Conflict Horrors

C: Javier Manzano / Two rebel soldiers in Syria guard their sniper's nest in the Karmel Jabl neighborhood of Aleppo as light streams through more than a dozen holes made by bullets and shrapnel in the tin wall behind them. The dust from more than one hundred days of shelling, bombing and firefights hung in the air. Karmel Jabl is strategically important because of its proximity to the main road that separates several of the main battlegrounds in the city. Both sides (the Free Syria Army and the regime) rely heavily on snipers in a cat and mouse game along Aleppo's frontlines. (Photo taken October 18, 2012)

Credit: Javier Manzano / Two rebel soldiers in Syria guard their sniper’s nest in the Karmel Jabl neighborhood of Aleppo as light streams through more than a dozen holes made by bullets and shrapnel in the tin wall behind them. The dust from more than one hundred days of shelling, bombing and firefights hung in the air. Karmel Jabl is strategically important because of its proximity to the main road that separates several of the main battlegrounds in the city. Both sides (the Free Syria Army and the regime) rely heavily on snipers in a cat and mouse game along Aleppo’s frontlines. (Photo taken October 18, 2012)

Everyday life for Syrian children and families rendered in Pulitzer prized photos. The 2013 winners for Breaking News are Rodrigo Abd, Manu Brabo, Narciso Contreras, Khalil Hamra, and Muhammed Muheisen, all for the Associated Press and freelance photographer Javier Manzano from Agence France-Presse for best Feature Photography prize

Credit: Manu Brabo / AP A Syrian man cries while holding the body of his son near Dar el-Shifa hospital in Aleppo in October 2012. The boy was killed by the Syrian government forces

Credit: Manu Brabo / AP
A Syrian man cries while holding the body of his son near Dar el-Shifa hospital in Aleppo in October 2012. The boy was killed by the Syrian government forces

Credit: Rodrigo Abd / AP A boy called Ahmed mourns during his father's funeral in Idlib in March 2012. The child's father was killed by a Syrian army sniper

Credit: Rodrigo Abd / AP
A boy called Ahmed mourns during his father’s funeral in Idlib in March 2012. The child’s father was killed by a Syrian army sniper

Credit: Manu Brabo / AP A wounded woman still in shock leaves Dar el-Shifa hospital in September 2012. She was injured during shelling by Syrian government forces which killed dozens of civilians, including four children, in Aleppo

Credit: Manu Brabo / AP
A wounded woman still in shock leaves Dar el-Shifa hospital in September 2012. She was injured during shelling by Syrian government forces which killed dozens of civilians, including four children, in Aleppo

Credit: Narciso Contreras / AP A rebel sniper aims at a Syrian army position, as he and another rebels are reflected in a mirror in the Jedida district of Aleppo

Credit: Narciso Contreras / AP
A rebel sniper aims at a Syrian army position, as he and another rebels are reflected in a mirror in the Jedida district of Aleppo

Advertisements

About Cristina Popa

Cristina is a WordPress blogger who regularly writes or shares updates on media, public affairs and various topics of interest. You may follow her on Communication for Development WP blog or Twitter @CristinaPopa0
This entry was posted in Human Rights, International Affairs, Media and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Pulitzer For Coverage of Syrian Conflict Horrors

  1. Our experience in Boston gives us a glimpse of how many people in other parts of the world live every day. Tragic man’s inhumanity to man.

    • Cristina P. says:

      Yes, unfortunately for them and others it’s everyday mourning. Especially for children this has stopped being breaking news although the Pulitzer award bears this category title.

  2. Maggie Thom says:

    It is so unbelievable that people have to live with that every day. So sad. And so wrong.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s